Ucchusma Meteorite NWA 2932, Mesosiderite Tsa Tsa – Souvenirs from space


Ucchusma Meteorite NWA 2932, Mesosiderite Tsa Tsa

RARE…….RARE……RARE

Sold- Germany

NWA  2932  Meteorite . This is one of those meteorites that are starting to disappear from the marketplace. When circulation falls, usually price rises in short order, as collectors buy up the last remaining inventory available. This specimen has a nice polish that gives the abundant metal a mirror-like finish, the necessary steps were taken when polishing this stone, so your left with a stable specimen that wont rust under ordinary conditions. Plus this meteorite contains so much iron, we included some silica balls that turn color when attention is needed.

Mesosiderites may appear to some collectors and enthusiasts as ugly ducklings when compared to their beautiful cousins, the pallasites. Mesosiderites take their name from the Greek words for “iron” and “half” and are comprised of approximately equal amounts of nickel-iron and stony components. Most are brecciated and many show broken and irregular inclusions of silicate minerals, rich in magnesium. Silvery metallic flakes and veins stand out starkly against the dark silicates, and polished, prepared slices are sometimes reminiscent of the night sky. The breccia-like consistency of mesosiderites has led meteoriticists to theorize that they may have been formed by large asteroidal collisions, which fused the disparate types of material into a single mass. Prominent meteoriticists Dr. John T. Wasson and Dr. Alan E. Rubin elaborated in a letter to Nature:

During the period of planet formation, mesosiderites originated by the low-velocity collisions of large metallic core fragments with the surface of a differentiated asteroid-size body … these collisions reduced mantles and crusts to small silicate fragments but left cores in the form of large, durable metal fragments.

Like the pallasites, mesosiderites are extremely rare, with only about fifty documented examples.

 

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~ by ucchusma on June 10, 2010.

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